Satan’s Tactics for Bringing Us Down

Satan doesn’t have new tactics. He doesn’t need them. The process of temptation and fall into sin and its consequences looks the same so much of the time.

  1. Satan highlights what God has forbidden rather than what he has given to incite sinful desire, grounded in self-sufficiency, self-confidence, and self-trust (‘but God said’ / ‘the LORD has prevented me’)
  2. Satan induces faith in self to determine right & wrong rather than faith in God’s word (‘so when the woman saw’ / ‘behold … it may be’)
  3. Satan maximizes the damage and uses the faithlessness destroy the faith of others (‘you have listened to the voice of your wife’ / ‘Abram listened to the voice of Sarai’)
  4. Satan knows that we were made for fellowship, so he exploits that for sin (‘she also gave some to her husband…’ / she ‘took Hagar the Egyptian, her servant, and gave her to Abram her husband’)
  5. Satan’s plotting brings guilt & shame as we realize what we’ve done (‘the eyes of both were opened’ / ‘when she saw…’)
  6. Satan happily leaves us to deal, in misery, with the consequences of our sin (‘they sewed fig leaves together’ / ‘she looked with contempt on her mistress’)

May God keep us faithful and wary for our enemies attacks. This is how they typically go. Thank the Lord that he has given us a way of escape (1 Cor 10.13) in the gospel of Jesus.

5 thoughts on “Satan’s Tactics for Bringing Us Down

  1. Hi Julian. I admire your passion for God and your family. Keep up the good work He is doing in and through you! I have taught on (and blogged about, I'm sure) Satan's tactics in those first verses of Genesis a lot. If you are like me you value comments and feedback and discussion on your blog, so I might add a bit to what you have shared (and you shared a lot I don't normally share about, thanks!). If that isn't welcome, please forgive me.
    It has struck me that before Eve was even truly tempted, she had to first doubt God's character. Satan caused her to question what God really said (His Word), then basically called God a liar (His trustworthiness), and then told her why God "really" didn't want her to taste the fruit, because she'd become like God (implying that God was holding something good back from her, thus doubting that God really loved her and had her best interests at heart). It strikes me that AFTER she doubted God's Word, trustworthiness, and love for her (basically, after she doubted God's character) THEN she saw the tree was pleasing to the eye (senses/pleasure), good for food (provision), and able to make one wise (wisdom). It seems to me that almost all the sin we struggle with can fall into one of those three—seeking to find pleasure, provision, or wisdom apart from God and His Word and ways. And, it seems to me, it comes after we start to question the character of God. Another thing we doubt a lot about God that cripples our faith is His power. Sarah laughs and is asked, basically, "Is anything too hard for God," implying she doubted God's ability. It strikes me that doubting God's Word, trustworthiness, love, and power/capability are at the core of doubting God and ceasing to walk in faith. If we are confident of those things about God we see to walk strong, but when we doubt them then we seek to find pleasure, provision, and wisdom apart from Him and His Word. I don't know if any of that helps or if you even agree with it, but thought I'd throw it out. God bless you and yours. —Erick

    • Thanks, Erick! You're comments are helpful indeed. I think a lot of what you have stated is what I had going on in my mind — you just stated it more extensively. If we doubt God's goodness and God's power then we'll necessarily replace faith in him with faith in ourselves and our ability to determine right and wrong. And that's never good.

      • Thanks for not minding. God bless you and yours. I love your love for God and your family. I look forward to receiving your blogs in my email inbox. Keep it up, and if I can ever be a friend just let me know.