Julian Freeman

Freed to live through the death of another.

Bible Reading Plan for 2011

Pretty much any Christian who has lived for a little while as a Christian can look back at their lives and recognize that the seasons of life when they’ve known the most blessing are those seasons when they’ve been most faithful to read through the Bible. That’s certainly been the case for me!  You look at life through an altogether different set of eyes when your mind is being renewed and transformed by the word of God.

What better New Years resolution could there be than to spend more time hearing from God in his word?

As you may or may not remember, last year I posted a Bible reading plan that I had put together. I was thrilled to have a few brothers and sisters eager to use it. I even got the big thumbs-up from uber-blogger extraordinaire, Tim Challies.

This year I made a few revisions to that plan (largely to the order of the reading for the NT books). As I’ve had a couple people ask, I thought I’d post the new plan here for this year for any more people who are still looking for a Bible reading plan for 2011.

You can download the 2011 Bible Reading Plan here.

While there are certainly myriads of Bible reading plans out there, I’ve found this one pretty helpful. Here are some of the features of it.

  • You will find that you are reading through the OT and the NT simultaneously. That helps keep you from getting too bogged down at certain points.
  • OT prophets are placed in (roughly) where they would have ministered chronologically. This helps break up the monotony of reading through huge chunks of narrative and prophets, by intermixing the two. It also helps you understand the historical and redemptive context for the prophets.
  • The NT is organized into bodies of literature. You begin with the the Petrine body of literature (Mark, which was sourced from Peter’s eye-witness account, and Peter’s epistles). Then you read Matthew and the other books written particularly for Jews. Next, with Luke-Acts and Paul’s epistles, you read through material written for Gentile audiences. You will conclude the year with the Johannine body of literature (all the books written by John).

Overall, the variety and structure hopefully helps to ‘change things up’ enough that it doesn’t feel like every other time you’ve tried to read through the Bible.

Let me know if you’ve got any questions / comments / suggestions for improving the plan for next year!

And just as a PS, here’s Piper talking about the Bible. I offer it as a little ‘kick in the pants’ to get reading! 🙂

5 Comments

  1. Thank you Julian!

    • Julian

      3 January, 2011 at 12:05 pm

      You're welcome, Renee. 🙂

      Hopefully you don't mind the variation in order this year … you hadn't started reading John yet, had you?

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